5/15/09

Korat





Korat Cat Breed Introduction

The Korat is another ancient breed of cat from the Far East, this time from Thailand, where the breed is also called the Si-Sawat.

Korat Behavior/Personality

Source: Cat Fanciers Association's breed profile

Korats are generally thought to be warm and cuddly, active but gentle.

Korat Breed Standard/Physical Description

Here are some facts on the Korat breed based on the Cat Fanciers Association's breed standard.

  • Head: heartshaped
  • Ears: set high on head, large, with a rounded tip and large flare at base,
  • Eyes: large
  • Body: Broad chested , muscular
  • Legs: well-proportioned to body, front legs slightly shorter than back legs
  • Paws: oval, Toes: five in front and four behind
  • Tail: medium in length, tapering to a rounded tip
  • Coat: short in length, glossy and fine

Korat History

Source: Cat Fanciers Association's breed profile

The oldest known picture of one of a Korat cat dates to the Ayudhya Period (1350-1767). The picture is in The Cat-Book Poems in the National Library at Bangkok. Why is the breed named "Korat?" It was named by a king for the province from which the cat is said to have originated. King Rama V (1869-1910) commissioned Somdej Phra Buddhacharn Buddhasarmahathera, a monk, to create a new copy of The Cat-Book Poems. King Rama admired the picture of the Korat cat, and named the cat for the province when told where it was from.

Today in Thailand, Korats are called Si-Sawat. The first Korats known to have been brought to the United States were Nara and Darra, who came in 1959.

Javanese


Javanese Cat Breed Introduction

The Javanese cat breed was one of numerous cat breeds developed in the United States in the mid-twentieth century; it is essentially a colorpoint shorthair offshoot of the Balinese breed, which in turn was an offshoot of the Siamese breed.

Javanese Behavior/Personality

Source: Cat Fanciers Association's breed profile

Javanese cats are generally considered easy to care for, and friendly. They often seem to enjoy using their paws as hands, opening doors, quite literally-at least, for cabinet doors.

Javanese Breed Standard/Physical Description

Here are some facts on the Javanese breed based on the Cat Fanciers Association's breed standard.

  • Head: long, tapered wedge, medium size
  • Ears: large, pointed, wide at base
  • Eyes: almond shaped, medium size
  • Body: medium size, long
  • Legs: long, slim, hind legs longer than the forelegs
  • Paws: small, oval, Toes: five in front and four behind
  • Tail: long, thin, tapered to a fine point
  • Coat: colorpoint shorthair

Javanese History

Source: Cat Fanciers Association's breed profile

The history of the Javanese cat breed is fairly straightforward. The breed is one of the relatively new cat breeds to appear toward the middle of the twentieth century, developed by cat fanciers. The Javanese breed is an offshoot from the Balinese breed, and was named for Java, the island next over from Bali in Indonesia. The Balinese, in turn, was an offshoot from the Siamese cat breed.

The Javanese is essentially a colorpoint shorthair Balinese. Colorpoint shorthair kittens had always been born to Balinese litters, but since they did not fit the Balinese breed standard, they were not allowed to compete in shows. Breeders who liked the colorpoint shorthair kittens petitioned the cat fancier organizations for recognition of the cats as a new breed, finally succeeding in the 1980s, when the new breed was named Javanese.

5/8/09

Japanese Bobtail Cat




in tradisional art


Three Japanese Maneki-neko cat figurines. The first is a Japanese bobtail cat - the traditional cat portrayed with Maneki-neko figures. The second one is a Tsushima cat, and the third is an Iriomote cat, a rare Japanese wild cat.

Japanese Bobtail Cat Breed Introduction


The Japanese Bobtail cat breed is the quintessentially Japanese cat breed and one of the oldest breeds of cat on earth. Japanese Bobtails are immortalized in the Japanese statues of the cat with one paw raised, gracing the entrances of innumerable Japanese businesses.

Japanese Bobtail Behavior/Personality

Source: Cat Fanciers Association's breed profile

Japanese Bobtails are widely considered active and intelligent. They also actively seek out the company of human beings. Fun fact: they tend to like to carry things in their mouths. No divas, they are generally thought to travel well and get along well with children, dogs, and other animals.

Japanese Bobtail Breed Standard/Physical Description

Here are some facts on the Japanese Bobtail breed based on the Cat Fanciers Association's breed standard.

  • Head: equilateral triangle with gentle curving lines
  • Ears: large, upright, set wide apart
  • Eyes: large, oval
  • Body: medium in length, long and lean
  • Legs: straight, high, hind legs longer than the forelegs
  • Paws: oval, Toes: five in front and four behind
  • Tail: short
  • Coat: Shorthair: medium length, soft, silky. Longhair: medium-long to long, soft, silky, noticeable undercoat

Japanese Bobtail History

Source: Wikipedia

The Japanese Bobtail is one of the oldest breeds of cat in the world. It is also the quintessentially Japanese cat breed. In fact, if you've ever been to a Japanese restaurant, you've probably seen these cats without realizing it. The Japanese Bobtail is the kind of cat represented in the statues of a cat sitting with one paw raised, placed near the entrances of many Japanese businesses. These statues are called maneki-neko and are good luck charms.

The history of Japanese Bobtails closely parallels the history of cats in Japan. The first cats came to Japan at least 1000 years ago, which is when the first written evidence of cats in Japan dates from. According to that written evidence, the first cats in Japan came from China or Korea.

The history of cats in Japan was forever altered by a 1602 decree that all cats be set free, in order to exterminate rodents that were hurting the silk worms. Japanese Bobcats became feral street urchins and country cats.